Random Acts of IT Project Management

Project Management for Information Technology

Posts Tagged ‘project failure’

Railing Against Project Bureaucrats

Posted by iammarchhare on 3 September 2009

Being a project manager is walking a fine line.  Many mistake project management for doing EVM, making a schedule, filling out a charter, and so on.  These are functions of a PM, but they are not the most important.

TechRepublic posted “Managing innovative projects: Don’t mistake the map for the journey” by Rick Freedman.  Freeman writes about these paper pushers who “manage” projects:

When I teach project management, I often draw a distinction between project managers and project bureaucrats. We’ve all had encounters with project managers who turned into bureaucrats. Project bureaucrats are more interested in ensuring that every step of the methodology is applied and every line of every form is filled in than in what’s actually happening on the ground. On the other hand, it’s common to meet project managers who apply minimal project methodology, yet, through their expert use of relationships and personal interactions, always seem to know exactly where the project stands.

He goes on to give an excellent example of a project failure.  That is, it was a bureaucratic failure.  Yet, the product was an ultimate success.  The product was the film Titanic.

So, how does he view being innovative while still maintaining project discipline?  You’ll need to read his article to find out.

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Posted in Agile, Leadership, PM Basics | Tagged: , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

What Is the Most Important Part of a Project?

Posted by iammarchhare on 22 April 2009

Most of the time, a project manager will say “requirements gathering”.  Once upon a time, I probably would have agreed.  But, I don’t any longer.

Toni Bowers of TechRepublic posted on the IT Leadership blog “Five reasons to discuss project failure”.  She writes:

  1. Failure is instructive. Most of us have an instinctive aversion to discussing weakness, based on concerns that criticism may hurt our pride, reputation, and so on. While I deeply respect these sensitivities, fear creates an environment where repeated cycles of failure can manifest. Breaking this cycle requires understanding the source of problems followed by developing solutions to address them.

Failure causes you to learn.  Hopefully, success does as well.  Humans have an amazing capacity to learn, and we should do so at every opportunity.  If we do not learn, we do not improve professionally or grow personally.

Teams and even companies can learn as well.  That’s why Bowers’ article is so important.  If teams and companies cannot face the facts and learn, then they never improve.  Projects will continue to fail.

A thorough “lessons learned” or “after action” review is a must.  The US Army has a tradition of sending soldiers on field exercises and then holding after action reviews afterwards to grade themselves.  Self-reflection is the key to improvement.

That’s why in the long run requirements gathering just plain is not as important!  Why?  Because a thorough lessons learned review will uncover it as a weakness and make recommendations to fix the problem.  If you do lessons learned poorly or not at all, you will never know if your requirements gathering is any good or not!

What if you had a project to create a product, it was done on time and under budget, it was delivered and the customer never complained.  Was the project a success?  How do you know?

There is a saying that for every customer that complains, there are 9 others who have the same problem but do not complain.  It could be because they are too busy or too tired, or maybe they don’t know who to complain to.  Just because no one complains does not mean the project was a success.  Again, you have to gather data after the main portions of the project have been completed.

The fact that I’ve changed my mind about “requirements gathering” is proof I’m not too old to learn.  🙂

Posted in PM Basics, SDLC, Skills | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »